August 27, 2014

Conflicts Case to Note

IEC was notified by one of our subscribers about a case to watch: 

Lorillard v. U.S. FDA, 2014 WL 3585883 (D.D.C.).

It covers FACA, Conflicts of Interest, SGEs; the court strongly disagreed with the DAEO’s determination that no conflict of interest existed (Court found a direct and predictable effect existed where the DAEO did not).

Thank you for the contribution!

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

September 27, 2013

Lawyer is accused of faking illness to avoid oral arguments; ethics complaint says he didn’t vomit

An Illinois lawyer is accused in an ethics complaint of faking illness to avoid oral arguments before the Chicago-based 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The Aug. 29 complaint by the Illinois Registration and Disciplinary Commission alleges that Michael Joseph Finn told a court clerk on April 14, 2011—the day of oral arguments—that he had vomited that morning and was too ill to come to court. In reality, the complaint alleges, Finn was not ill. “He did not vomit and he was well enough to go to court,” the complaint alleges. “Respondent did not go to court because he felt unprepared.”

The complaint does not cite the basis for that conclusion. It does say Finn had paid a brief writer $5,000 to prepare drafts of appeals briefs on behalf of his client, Kenneth Clark. Finn had accepted $15,000 to represent Clark.

According to the complaint, the clerk’s office told Finn to keep his phone nearby in case his appearance was required, but Finn did not answer or return phone messages left by the clerk.

The 7th Circuit panel held oral arguments without Finn, and Finn’s client lost the appeal. In an order to show cause, the appeals court said Finn should supply medical documentation of his illness, such as a certificate showing his admission to a hospital emergency room. Finn supplied no documentation, and the court fined him $1,000 in its Sept. 15, 2011 opinion, the complaint says.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

September 11, 2013

Article on Ethics in the Sports World

Michelle Simms, Director of the Air Force Ethics Office, shares her article on ethics in the sports world.  The article may be found here http://afgeneralcounsel.dodlive.mil/2013/09/11/2436/

 

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, Miscellaneous | Permalink

April 30, 2013

ABA opinion cautions judges to avoid ethics pitfalls of social media

Judges don’t have to sit by the now-proverbial telephone hoping to make contact with the rest of the world. Instead, they may join the growing numbers of people who participate in electronic social networking.

That was the conclusion reached by the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility in its Formal Opinion 462 (Judge’s Use of Electronic Social Networking Media), issued on Feb. 21. (ABA ethics opinions are identified by the numeric order in which they are issued, but Opinion 462 is the first one since the 1980s that does not also include a two-digit prefix designating the year of issuance.)

In its opinion, the ethics committee notes that electronic social media “has become an everyday part of worldwide culture.” The opinion describes ESM as Internet-based electronic social networking sites that require an individual to affirmatively join and accept or reject connection with particular individuals.

But the opinion also urges judges to enter this particular electronic highway with extreme caution, for two primary reasons:  first, the Model Code of Judicial Conduct does not specifically address a judge’s participation in electronic social media and second, judges must be careful what they post, as wide dissemination has the potential to compromise or appear to compromise the independence, integrity and impartiality of the judge, as well as to undermine public confidence in the judiciary.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Issues: Misuse of Position, Legal Ethics | Permalink

April 26, 2013

Former DA jailed after judge issues scathing opinion in rare Texas court of inquiry

ABA Journal reports:  An unusual court of inquiry held to probe the conduct of a former Texas district attorney has concluded with a blistering opinion by the presiding judge.

Former Williamson County District Attorney Ken Anderson was briefly booked into jail Friday before being released on $7,500 bail after District Judge Louis Sturns determined that there was probable cause to support charges that Anderson had violated state law and acted in contempt of court by lying to a trial judge decades ago to win a conviction in a murder case, the American-Statesman reports.

The convicted man, Michael Morton, served nearly 25 years before he was exonerated.

“This court cannot think of a more intentionally harmful act than a prosecutor’s conscious choice to hide mitigating evidence so as to create an uneven playing field for a defendant facing a murder charge and a life sentence,” Sturns said.

Sturns found that Anderson concealed two critical items of evidence that could have helped Morton avoid conviction at trial. First, a police interview transcript showed that Morton's young son had witnessed the murder and said his father wasn't home when it occurred. Second, a man had parked a green van near the Morton home and several times walked into a wooded area behind the house.

The Judge's ruling represents the first step toward a potential prosecution of Anderson, who is now a sitting state court judge. Sturns issued a separate show-cause order requiring Anderson to appear in court to defend a criminal contempt citation, for which he could be sentenced to a maximum $500 fine and six months in jail if he is convicted.  Anderson's lawyer, Eric Nichols, said his client will appeal on statute-of-limitations grounds. He also argues that the facts do not support Sturns' finding and says he believes the court of inquiry went beyond the scope of its authority.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, News | Permalink

February 02, 2012

February 2012 Presentation Materials: Ethics & Govt Lawyers

Here is the handout for today's IEC presentation, ETHICS & THE GOVERNMENT LAWYER.  Download Ethics & Govt Lawyer handout (02-02-2012)

Please try to bring a copy with you to today's presentation.

Posted by Account Deleted in IEC Meetings, Legal Ethics | Permalink

January 25, 2012

Former CIA employee indicted for disclosing classified information

"A former CIA officer, John Kiriakou, was charged today with repeatedly disclosing classified information to journalists, including the name of a covert CIA officer and information revealing the role of another CIA employee in classified activities, Justice Department officials announced."  See the full DOJ press release at: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2012/January/12-ag-083.html.

Posted by Account Deleted in Issues: Misuse of Govt. Resources, Legal Ethics | Permalink

November 03, 2011

More on E-mail and Attorney Client Privilege

A Nov. 1 ABA Journal article discusses the ABA ethics opinions discussed here in a previous post. This attorney client privilege issue could come up easily in the course of working as an ethics officer.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

October 27, 2011

ABA Advisory Opinions on Email Privacy

While our primary focus is federal ethics issues, we occasionally discuss legal ethics issues that we think may be of interest to our readers. Therefore, we note two American Bar Association legal ethics advisory opinions on privacy in electronic communications, including email. The second is particularly relevant to IG lawyers who represent management in personnel litigation, where management is monitoring the employee’s electronic communications, and the employee is using email to communicate with his lawyer. Some courts had ruled the employer’s lawyer had a duty to advise the employee that e-mail on the government computer was being monitored. Here is our understanding of the key elements in each opinion:

1.     Does lawyer have duty to warn client who is using insecure method of e-mail to communicate? Yes.

2.     Does lawyer have duty to advise opposing side that they are using an insecure method of e-mail and/or that he has obtained access to their communications? Not necessarily. The opinion advises:

“Under circumstances where there is no clear legal precedent in the jurisdiction that would require the lawyer to notify the court or the opposing party that he has received the employee emails, the lawyer may not do so unless the client consents.”

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

July 25, 2011

DOJ Official To Defense Bar: Stop Playing Games With Ethics

Without directly referencing the Roger Clemens case, Assistant Attorney General defended federal prosecutors in a recent speech covered by Legal Times:

Some attorneys in the defense bar, Breuer said today, are too eager to call every government mistake an example of prosecutorial misconduct. Breuer did not identify cases and he did not name names.

“Certain defense lawyers nevertheless continue to want to try and turn honest mistakes into instances of misconduct,” Breuer said. “This kind of gamesmanship is unfortunate."

Breuer said the department’s steps to reduce prosecutorial error “go further than what the Supreme Court requires. And they go well beyond what any prior Administration has done. That’s a fact. Do we need to remain vigilant? Absolutely.”

He said DOJ will not shy from taking hard cases “or otherwise shrink from our obligation to investigate and prosecute criminal activity without fear or favor, because of the possibility that an opportunistic defense lawyer will try and make hay out of an honest mistake."

And then Breuer repeated a line that Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. has trumpeted in fending off critics: “Our job is not just to win cases, but also to do justice in every case."

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

July 12, 2011

FBA Legal Ethics CLE Program July 21

The Federal Bar Association, Capitol Hill Chapter, is sponsoring its annual ethics symposium entitled "Government Ethics Funhouse! How Each Branch Approaches Government Ethics." The 2-hour program will be held on July 21, 2011 from 9:30am to 11:30 am at the Montpellier Room, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave, SE, Washington, DC.  Here’s a summary of the program:

This lightening-paced, two-hour, ethics CLE symposium in panel “game show” form will have participants simultaneously laughing and sharpening their legal ethics analytical skills.  Jack Marshall, of ProEthics, Ltd, will lead three legal ethics experts, Jim Lager from GAO, Eric Riser from DoD, and Robert Deyling from Administrative Office of US Courts, in answering and discussing legal ethics questions, hypotheticals, and dilemmas posed in various diabolical ways involving the audience in competition with the panel. All of the problems discussed will be based on current cases, controversies and events–some of them right up to the minute.

The program flyer has more information:

Download FBA Ethics Funhouse Program Flyer doc

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

May 24, 2011

Prosecutor Sues DOJ over Leak of Ethics Probe

From the Legal Times blog, BLT:

Former federal prosecutor Richard Convertino wants an appeals court in Washington to revive his suit that alleges the U.S. Justice Department unlawfully leaked information about an ethics investigation stemming from his work on a terror case in Detroit. ...

Convertino sued DOJ in February 2004, alleging the government intentionally leaked to the press information about an Office of Professional Responsibility misconduct probe to retaliate against him for congressional testimony.

The plaintiff's inability to identify the leaker apparently motivated the District Court to grant the DOJ motion for summary judgment.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

May 08, 2011

Virginia State Bar Reprimands Former DOJ Lawyer

Virginia Lawyers Weekly reports that the Virginia State Bar has reprimanded the key official accused of violating civil service hiring rules during the Bush administration. A copy of the reprimand is available.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

May 07, 2011

CLE: Ethical Red Flags for Public Lawyers--May 25

Register at ABA Government and Public Lawyers Division:

Ethical 'Red Flags' for Public Lawyers: Responsibilities, Conflicts and More
CLE Teleconference on May 25, 2011
1:00 - 2:30 PM Eastern

This program focuses on the unique ethical issues confronted by public lawyers using an entertaining, interactive format. Expert panelists dramatize illustrative hypothetical scenarios followed by a discussion session after each hypo. Program topics include: special conflicts of interest for former and current government officers and employees; duties to former clients; communication with persons represented by counsel; organization as a client, and more.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

May 03, 2011

Unusual Prof. Responsibility Note

In a very unusual case, a South Dakota judge pleads to keep his job, even after a 6-month suspension for rudeness to attorneys, parties and court staff.  See http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/shamed_judge_pleads_to_keep_his_job_tells_top_sd_court/ and background article at http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/udge_faces_potential_removal_due_to/

Posted by Account Deleted in Legal Ethics | Permalink

March 23, 2011

ABA Admin Law Conference includes Prof. Respon for Govt Attorneys

The American Bar Association Section of Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice is holding a conference in Charlottesville Virginia April 8-11, 2011.  If particular interest might be the Friday, April 8th session on "Ethics Obligations of Government Lawyers."

Topics for discussion include:

  • When does a government lawyer have a conflict? 
  • What happens when the government’s litigating agency has a position different from the represented agency? 
  • What does the agency lawyer do when an agency employee makes an allegation, with factual support, that a senior agency manager has violated the agency’s Standards of Conduct? 
  • Who is the client?   

Panelists will be:

  • Myles E. Eastwood, private practitioner, former Assistant United States Attorney, Atlanta, Georgia [Moderator]
  • Professor George M. Cohen, University of Virginia Law School, Charlottesville, VA
  • Leslie A.T. Haley, Senior Assistant Ethics Counsel, Virginia State Bar, Richmond, Virginia

See more information at http://adwww2.americanbar.org/calendar/6th-annual-homeland-security-law-institute/Documents/Spring%20Conference%202011%20Brochure.pdf

Posted by Account Deleted in Legal Ethics | Permalink

March 13, 2011

Intersection of Technology and Legal Ethics Issues

Legalethics.com is a team blog from a law school professor and a California lawyer  with the mission of "Focusing on the ethical issues associated with the use of technology by legal professionals."   It's a good place to find news about cases like this one, where a law firm was disqualified because a lawyer read and used information in an e-mail being mistakenly routed to them (allegedly due to an "autocomplete" error):

Email 'Oops' Ends with Gordon & Rees Being Booted from Case (Legal Pad).

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

March 12, 2011

Legal Ethics Bilbliographies

Researching a legal ethics issue? Duke and Georgetown law schools have online bibliographies.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, Web Resources | Permalink

February 09, 2011

Web CLE: Ethical Quandries for Public Lawyers

The ABA Government and Public Lawyers Division will host a legal ethics CLE program:

Thursday, February 25, 2010
10AM Pacific • 11AM Mountain •12 NOON Central •1PM Eastern

This program focuses on the unique ethical issues confronted by public lawyers using an entertaining, interactive format. Expert panelists dramatize illustrative hypothetical scenarios followed by a discussion session after each hypo.

Facebook may be the best source of information while the ABA website undergoes renovations.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, Training (to Attend) | Permalink

January 20, 2011

Justice creates new Prof. Misconduct Review Unit

Attorney General announced creation of a new unit to handle disciplinary actions for career attorneys at the Department of Justice that arise from Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) investigations.  See press release at http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2011/January/11-ag-060.html.

Posted by Account Deleted in Legal Ethics | Permalink

December 28, 2010

USAToday follow up article on DOJ attorney misconduct impact

A follow up to USAToday's prior article assessing statistics on the impact of DOJ attorney's misconduct in criminal cases, which leads to felons with reduced sentences.  See article at http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/judicial/2010-12-28-1Aprosecutorpunish28_CV_N.htm?csp=usat.me 

Posted by Account Deleted in Legal Ethics, News | Permalink

December 27, 2010

Robin Ashton New Head of the Office of Professional Responsibility

Attorney General Eric Holder today announced the appointment of Robin C. Ashton to serve as head of the Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) at the Department of Justice.

 

“As a veteran career prosecutor, Robin is uniquely qualified to serve as Counsel for Professional Responsibility, and I am confident she will lead the office with the highest standards of professionalism, integrity and dedication,” said Attorney General Holder.

 

The Office of Professional Responsibility is responsible for investigating allegations of professional misconduct involving department attorneys.

via DOJ Press Release

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, News | Permalink

December 09, 2010

USA Today Article on Federal Prosecutors

USA Today article discussing the impact of professional responsibility and errors by Federal prosecutors. http://www.usatoday.com/cleanprint/?1291894889050 

Posted by Account Deleted in Legal Ethics | Permalink

October 06, 2010

Interesting Developments in Professional Responsibility

1.  INTERNATIONAL ETHICS - CHOICE OF LAW

 

Did you know most national ethical rules do not include choice-of-law provisions that would permit such international rules to displace otherwise applicable national rules.  In the absence of such choice-of-law rules, new rules for international arbitration may be limited in their utility.  By way of example, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia has its own code of conduct for counsel, which expressly permits pre-testimonial communication with witnesses.  Attorneys from certain jurisdictions, however, are not able to rely on that rule because their national ethical rules do not contain a choice-of-law provision that allows the ICTY ethical rules to supersede their local ethical rules, which prohibit such contact.

 

The U.S. is one of very few jurisdictions (along with the UK) that has in its ethical rules general choice-of-law provisions that apply to activities before international tribunals.  (Some other jurisdictions, such as France, Belgium and Switzerland, have choice-of-law provisions regarding the specific issue of contact with witnesses before international tribunals.) Unfortunately, the U.S. provisions, found in Model Rule 8.5, were drafted with domestic tribunals in mind and as a consequence have numerous problems and limitations when applied to international tribunals, particularly when such tribunals do not have their own ethical rules, as is the case with international arbitration.  

 

To redress some of these problems, Prof. Catherine Rodgers & Prof. Laurel Terry of Penn State Law drafted proposed modifications to Model Rule 8.5, which will be presented by Prof Terry later this month to the American Bar Association's Commission on Ethics 20/20.   

 

2.  TEXAS PROPOSED BAN ON SEX WITH CLIENTS

 

A recent ABA Journal article discusses the proposed changes to the Texas Bar professional responsibility rules, in particular the proposal to limit an attorney's ability to have sex with his client.  See full article at http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/proposed_texas_ban_on_sex_with_clients_is_subject_of_hot_debate/

Posted by Team 2 in Legal Ethics | Permalink

June 24, 2010

After July 1 Meeting - Interest in Prof. Responsilbity Discussion?

At the May OGE conference there was some discussion about the related topic of Federal Professional Responsibility.  Those interested in an exchange of resources and information related to providing PR advice and counsel to Federal practitioners, please anticipate a "stay-behind" following the upcoming IEC presentation. 

If you cannot attend but are interested, please send a note to: jobs@iecjournal.org.  Thank you.

Posted by Team 2 in IEC Meetings, Legal Ethics | Permalink

May 13, 2010

ABA CLE Program on Legal Ethics

The ABA Government and Public Lawyer Division's CLE program Ethical Quandaries for Public Lawyers: Conflicts, Trial Publicity, Organization as a Client and More is available in the following formats:

  • Online
  • CD
  • Downloadable MP3

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, Training (to Attend) | Permalink

May 03, 2010

Communications With Represented Persons

The issue of when a government lawyer may communicate with a person represented by an attorney comes up from time to time. Department of Justice guidelines and 28 C.F.R. Part 77 may be useful.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

February 22, 2010

Report: Terror Memos Didn't Violate Legal Ethics Rules

The Justice Department's Office of Professional Responsibility report on allegations that Bush administration lawyers violates legal ethics rules by writing memos authorizing harsh interrogations for terrorism detainees is available. The report concludes that the lawyers "exercised poor judgment," but did not violate legal ethics rules.

A Washington Post article discusses the controversy over the report's conclusions.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink | Comments (0)

January 12, 2010

New DOJ Policies on Criminal Discovery

As reported on the main DOJ blog, Attorney General Holder recently issued new guidelines concerning criminal discovery.

NOTE: DOJ provides both an RSS feed and e-mail updates to make it easier to keep up with new developments.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, Web Resources | Permalink

December 15, 2009

Eight Questions for Government Pro Bono Lawyers

Cheryl Zalenski, an ABA-employed pro bono coordinator, has an essay entitled Eight Questions a Government Lawyer Should Ask Before Taking a Pro Bono Case. Ms. Zalenski also has a Twitter feed.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

December 10, 2009

DOJ Supports Immunity for Advice on Interrogation

The Department of Justice supports immunity for John Woo and other lawyers who drafted memos supporting controversial interrogation techniques. Not everyone agrees.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

December 09, 2009

Supreme Court Hears "Honest Services" Cases

The Christian Science Monitor analyzes three "honest services" cases being heard by the Supreme Court.

Note that it is easy to set up Google Alerts so that it will automatically send you e-mail updates on any topic you choose. This feature works best when you have a search term that filters well, such as "honest services."

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, Web Resources | Permalink

November 15, 2009

High Court Considers Prosecutorial Immunity

The Supreme Court heard arguments earlier this month advocating limits on prosecutorial immunity, with some justices expressing a surprising level of hostility toward the doctrine. The respected SCOTUS Blog provides analysis.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

October 21, 2009

CPI Finds Prosecutorial Misconduct Widespread

A recent Center for Public Integrity study found 2,000 cases overturned or otherwise modified by judges on account of prosecutorial misconduct.

(Via The Center for Public Integrity : Investigations.)

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

June 27, 2009

Issue With DOJ Nominee Withholding Client Names?

The Washington Times reports:
The criminal defense lawyer nominated by President Obama to be the top federal prosecutor in New Jersey is declining to identify more than half of his private clients on government forms designed to help the public guard against potential conflicts of interests.

Paul J. Fishman, nominated to serve as the U.S. attorney for New Jersey, is citing the privacy interests of the clients - an exemption that is permitted under federal ethics laws, but that leaves prosecutors on an honor system to police their own conflicts, ethics watchdogs say.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

May 29, 2009

DC Bar Legal Ethics CLE Program

This 3 credit hour program could be of particular interest to lawyers from states whose bars require annual training on ethics topics. More information is available at the DC Bar web site:

Ethics and the Government Lawyer 2009: Hot Topics and Issues

Monday, June 22, 2009 5:30 PM to 8:45 PM

Description: In recent years, media and public attention have sharply focused on the ethics of prosecutors and government attorneys. The traditional reluctance to subject government attorneys to bar discipline is evaporating nationwide, making it more important than ever to know what the Rules of Professional Conduct require… even though they often fit imperfectly with the special circumstances of government practice. This up-to-date class will help you sharpen your ethical analysis skills and increase your sensitivity to lurking ethical problems. You will examine recent legal ethics developments as they apply to government practice, using interactive hypothetical scenarios and discussions of current cases.

Cost for government lawyers is $89.00.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics, Training (to Attend) | Permalink

May 07, 2009

DOJ Authors of Controversial Memos Seek Consideration

A Washington Post story explains:

Former Bush administration officials have launched a behind-the-scenes campaign to urge Justice Department leaders to soften an ethics report criticizing lawyers who blessed harsh detainee interrogation tactics, according to two sources familiar with the efforts.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

April 19, 2009

CLE: Ethics and the Government Lawyer

The DC Bar Association will host a June 23 CLE program on the topic "Ethics and the Government Lawyer 2009: Hot Topics and Issues."

Here is the course description:

Credit: 3.0 Ethics Credit Hours

Description: In recent years, media and public attention have sharply focused on the ethics of prosecutors and government attorneys. The traditional reluctance to subject government attorneys to bar discipline is evaporating nationwide, making it more important than ever to know what the Rules of Professional Conduct require… even though they often fit imperfectly with the special circumstances of government practice. This up-to-date class will help you sharpen your ethical analysis skills and increase your sensitivity to lurking ethical problems. You will examine recent legal ethics developments as they apply to government practice, using interactive hypothetical scenarios and discussions of current cases. 

Location

D.C. Bar Conference Center
1101 K Street NW
(Metro Center)
Washington DC 20005
Contact
CLE Program 202-626-3488
Speakers
Jack Marshall, ProEthics
CLE Credit
Yes
Cost
Administrative Law and Agency Practice Section $89.00
Corporation, Finance and Securities Law Section $89.00
Courts Lawyers & Administration of Justice Section $89.00
Environment, Energy and Natural Resources Section $89.00
Labor and Employment Law Section $89.00
Litigation Section $89.00
Government Attorneys $89.00
DC Bar Member $99.00
Others $129.00

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

March 24, 2009

Legal Ethics and Electronic Discovery

A new law review article, E-Pitfalls: Ethics and E-Discovery posits that far from involving novel new legal issues, electronic discovery issues involve well-established principles of legal ethics. Thanks to the Federal Civil Practice Bulletin for the link.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

January 20, 2009

Metadata - What Is It and What Are My Ethical Duties?

Jim Calloway's article entitle Metadata - What Is It and What Are My Ethical Duties? has more information on a legal ethics topic covered in a previous IEC meeting.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

January 10, 2009

Revised Slides for January Presentation

Here is a link to the revised version of the slides for the recent presentation by Peggy Love and Steve Csontos on the topic "Seeking Employment and Post Employment Obligations for Government Attorneys Entering the Private Sector":

Download Seeking-Post Employment for Attorneys- IEC Meeting 109 (2)

Most of the changes are minor, but note that Slide #37 entitled "Resources" references an OGE Advisory Opinion which has been changed. The link above incorporates the correction.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in IEC Meetings, Issues: Post Employment, Issues: Seeking Employment, Legal Ethics | Permalink

December 29, 2008

Topic for Jan. 8 Meeting: Govt. Lawyer Transition to Private Sector

Peggy Love and Steve Csontos will speak on the topic "Seeking Employment and Post Employment Obligations for Government Attorneys Entering the Private Sector" at the Jan. 8 IEC meeting. Their MS PowerPoint slide show is available for pre-meeting downloads. If you want to save paper, remember that you can format the slide show to print three or six slides per page.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Issues: Post Employment, Issues: Seeking Employment, Legal Ethics | Permalink

December 02, 2008

Ethics of Metadata 2008

Jim Calloway, the respected Director of the Oklahoma State Bar's Management Assistance Program, provides his latest assessment of the controversy over lawyer access of metadata in a blog post entitled "Ethics of Metadata 2008." He links to a collection of all ethics opinions on the topic and expresses his skepticism concerning the practicality of those opinions that conclude examining metadata is unethical.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in Legal Ethics | Permalink

November 27, 2008

January 8 IEC Meeting: Gov. Attorneys Entering Private Sector

Peggy Love and Steve Csontos will speak at the Jan. 8 IEC meeting on "seeking and post-employment obligations for government attorneys entering the private sector," the same topic as Ms. Love's DC Bar presentation mentioned here earlier. Thanks to John Szabo for the tip.

Posted by IEC Team Leader in IEC Meetings, Issues: Post Employment, Legal Ethics | Permalink